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Exotic Car Auto Transport | Autos In Transit (800)595-2062

Exotic Car Auto Transport

Our organization provides dependable car transport to all makes and models of cars, including the secure shipping of thousands of exotic cars each year. Our vehicle shipping services facilitate these transactions with reliability and attention to detail.

Since we stay abreast of any breaking news related to the car industry, a recent headline caught our attention related to Scott K. Ginsberg, who is a big player in the sales of exotic vehicles. Industry updates help us maintain our edge so our customers know they have the sharpest possible advocate. Among top-tier brokers, we are renowned for making customer peace of mind our foremost priority.

Ginsberg came into his fortune in the late 90s via several radio broadcasting companies. He obviously knows business well. As one of the nation’s most experienced and trusted names in auto transport – evidenced by our strong customer reviews – we know our business well also, treating exotic vehicles with the care and respect they deserve. We also know our customers appreciate value, so we provide comparative quotes for a full array of options.

Georgetown & SEC Allegations

Ginsburg’s successful start drew the attention of many solicitors, among them the Georgetown University Law Center. In 1999 they approached him for contributions to the school. He signed an agreement with the law school to emboss bold letters with his name on side of the newly constructed fitness center.

That same year an accusation made by the Securities & Exchange Commission caused some negativity surrounding Ginsberg’s public image. The proposal for the building proceeded anyway, until a $5 million donation and publicized agreement was achieved in 2000. As for the pending accusations, the jury ruled in the favor of the SEC and Ginsberg was ordered to pay $1 million for his violations.

It wasn’t until 2002, and an additional $2.5 million in contributions, that it became apparent that Georgetown University had no intention of recognizing Ginsberg’s generosity as they had agreed. They switched gears, saying that they wanted to avoid damaging associations with his name until the SEC fiasco had fully resolved.

Lawsuit Pending

Twelve years later, Ginsberg is suing the school to the tune of at least $7.5 million collected as donations under misrepresentation of their proposition. In a statement made by Ginsberg, he expressed that he had “misjudged” his relationship with Georgetown. Now a judge will determine exactly what the financial relationship should be between the two parties moving forward.